Male and Female Pattern Hair Loss

Male and Female Pattern Hair Loss

Male pattern hair loss is often characterised by a receding hairline and thinning on the crown and top of the head.

It can start in the late teens or any time after. Progression differs greatly due to other influences, genetic and lifestyle choices. This rarely results in complete baldness. Hair around the sides and back remain unaffected.

Female pattern hair loss often causes diffuse thinning on the top of the head, but the hairline does not generally recede.

Unlike males this is more common around menopause and can be caused by a variety of factors tied to the action of hormones.

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Central Centrifugal Cicatricial Alopecia

Central Centrifugal Cicatricial Alopecia

Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia is the most common scarring alopecia in African American females.
Clinically this presents as a central area of progressive hair loss that extends to the periphery.

Many complain of pain, itching and altered sensation over the affected area. It can cause permanent loss due to the destruction of hair follicle by inflammation.

If this is caught and treated early, it can be possible to regenerate the follicles before the scaring is permanent.

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Frontal Fibrosing Alopecia

Frontal Fibrosing Alopecia

Frontal fibrosing alopecia is increasing in prevalence worldwide. Patients typically present with hair loss in the frontal scalp region and it can affect the eyebrows and eyelashes. This is a form of Lichen Planopilaris.

Frontal fibrosing alopecia is characterised by hair loss and scarring on the scalp around the forehead and hairline.

Early detection and prompt treatment are necessary to prevent definitive scarring and permanent loss. The main objective is to reduce the inflammation and prevent the disease progression.

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Anagen Effluvium

Anagen Effluvium

Anagen effluvium is a rapid amount of hair loss in a short period of time. This is usually the result of an environmental shock. The hairs stop growing although they are in the anagen (growing) phase.

Hair becomes brittle, weak and fractured and breaks away easily.

This can be due to Chemotherapy or those with Alopecia Areata can also be susceptible.

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Telogen Effluvium

Telogen Effluvium

Telogen effluvium is a common form of diffuse hair loss when the body goes through a traumatic event such as severe infection, virus, major surgery, child birth or nutrient deficiency.

The shedding can begin 3 to 6 months after the stressful event. It is possible to lose handfuls of hair or just experience increased loss.

The hairs that were the anagen (growing) or catagen (transitional) can move into the telogen (resting) phase and then fall.

Most will recover from this but for some females this can persist for many years. It is important therefore to understand and identify the triggers.

Printed from 'Hair Loss Handbook' with permission of the IAT and David Salinger

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